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Girl in the River

Girl in the River It s the middle of the twentieth century and Portland has fallen into the hands of gangsters Newly orphaned Mae Rose is on the lam from a knife wielding pimp mustering her own worst impulses to survi

  • Title: Girl in the River
  • Author: Patricia Kullberg
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 492
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • It s the middle of the twentieth century and Portland has fallen into the hands of gangsters Newly orphaned Mae Rose is on the lam from a knife wielding pimp, mustering her own worst impulses to survive, while Dr Ruth Barnett, queen of Portland s nightlife, runs a lucrative abortion service After the war, both women are caught in the cross hairs of anti vice crusader DoIt s the middle of the twentieth century and Portland has fallen into the hands of gangsters Newly orphaned Mae Rose is on the lam from a knife wielding pimp, mustering her own worst impulses to survive, while Dr Ruth Barnett, queen of Portland s nightlife, runs a lucrative abortion service After the war, both women are caught in the cross hairs of anti vice crusader Dottie Do good Lee But Mayor Lee s DA in pursuit has his own dirty little reasons to track Mae down Girl in the River is a portrait of the intimate lives of women during one of the most corrupt periods in Portland history It s an unflinching look at the power dynamics of sex A glimpse into the work life of a call girl An improbable love story The tale of post war assaults on reproductive rights And a tribute to two remarkable and remarkably different women who shaped the lives of Portlanders during those tumultuous times Dr Ruth Barnett and Mayor Dorothy Lee.

    • Best Download [Patricia Kullberg] · Girl in the River || [Memoir Book] PDF ì
      492 Patricia Kullberg
    • thumbnail Title: Best Download [Patricia Kullberg] · Girl in the River || [Memoir Book] PDF ì
      Posted by:Patricia Kullberg
      Published :2020-02-19T22:15:22+00:00

    1 thought on “Girl in the River

    1. Growing up Mae Rose lived in a boarding house with her mother Lily where a multitude of men came and went. When Lily died Mae went to live with a widower and his six children. The Rose home was in foreclosure. Unhappy Mae packed her bag and headed for Portland. She was 16 years old. Unable to find work she was homeless and at the mercy of others. Brutally real situations for all to comprehend. THANK YOU FIRSTREADS FOR THIS FREE BOOK!!!!!

    2. I was rooting for Mae from the first page, and the story had me seduced by the second chapter. Mae’s tale is one most women can relate to on some level; she does what she must to survive, but her choices often lead to unintended consequences. Her life unfolds in Portland, Oregon of an earlier era and Kullberg clearly did her research. She includes identifiable names and places in the city’s history in a way that both offers insight into human nature and gives credence to Mae’s story. Mae [...]

    3. What I like second best about this novel is that it dares greatly. What I like best about it is that it succeeds.The majority of the action takes place in Portland, Oregon in the 1940's, where we are introduced to the surprisingly cozy relationship between law, morality and vice that evolved in the city as a war-time boom lifted it out of the great depression. Through the character of Mae Rose, a high-priced prostitute and the protagonist of the novel, the author shows us some of those truths th [...]

    4. “Mae was used to being thanked. Many of her johns, especially her regulars, had been profuse, even pathetic, in their gratitude. A blessing was different. It made her want to work a hundred hours a day.”I received this book from the giveaway program. I am sorry to say, I had some health issues and lost the book for a time. However, after relocating it I was anxious to continue reading this great story. This is noir fiction at its darkest and best. Patricia Kullberg is a doctor who worked wi [...]

    5. Girl in the River is a novel based on actual events prior to, during, and just after WWII in Portland, Oregon. The main character, Mae Rose, is 16 and finds herself alone on the streets. She is desperate for food and a roof over her head, and is hoodwinked by a pimp, thrown in jail for no reason other than being out on the streets late at night and meets a woman who offers her a job in prostitution that is part of the night life of Portland. Corruption among the police, politicians and one-up-ma [...]

    6. Mae Rose has been living with her mother. She had clues that everything wasn't quite normal in her family when she found herself not being allowed to be friends with other kids. As she grew up, she realised why, her mother was a prostitute. She wanted to be nothing like her mother, but orphaned at 16, life pushes her into her m0ther's world.Set in the Portland of 1950s, a city controlled by criminals and crime, Mae Rose's life reflects the turbulent times that it was. 16 year old Mae Rose, newly [...]

    7. One of the best opening lines that I’ve read in a long time: “Even after a good stretch of untroubled time a girl might fret over which one of her mistakes was the worst ever. Until one day it struck her, when the biggest mistake barged back into her life.” This novel is at once gritty, sexy, funny, shocking, compassionate and feminist. Think a mashup of Isabel Allende with noir writer like Megan Abbott or maybe Sara Paretsky (but without the murder).The author writes lyrically and uses la [...]

    8. Girl in the River by Patricia Kullberg is a well written book about Portland, Oregon from the late thirties into the fifties. A young Mae Rose's mom dies from a botched abortion at the end of the depression. Having no family to help her, she moves from rural Oregon to Portland. Bad luck and dire economic times force her to make hard choices to survive.Well written, the book provides an interesting description of Portland and some of its residents, as Mae works to not only survive but thrive.5 st [...]

    9. I received this book as a free copy from GR w/ a personal note from the author-thank you! I learned a lot about the era (post war Portland, Oregon)while reading this and the author got a lot right about dialogue, settings and costume. I had a bit of a disconnect when the descriptors (both adjective and adverb) felt a little forced.

    10. Really enjoyable read. Now I'm curious about what is historical fact and how much is fiction. I hope young women will read this and learn not to take safe, legal abortion for granted.

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